The Homeless Who Offered Me His Food

I ordered my coffee in Hebrew. I speak a confident kitchen Hebrew. And I know many questions in Hebrew for which I don’t understand the answers yet.

But comes this homeless showing me a coin and instead of begging for money, he sits down on the chair beside me while he is chewing one of the chicken wings from a plate he carries in his left hand. In his right hand there is that coin.

He looks at me: “Metuka (my dear) ma ze (what’s this)?”

He really disturbed my thinking as I was I just outlining a project in my notebook.

And then I saw it was forint. It was Hungarian forint. What are the chances that a homeless walks up to me, a Hungarian, with a Hungarian forint?

“Ah, it is from Hungary.”

“How much does it worth?”

“Kzat meod (very little) I answer.”

“Kzat meod?”

“Ken, slicha.”

“Where does it say Hungary?”

(note that he actually thinks about the words I’ll understand)

“It says, Forint and that means Hungary.”

“At gara be Hungaria? (Do you live in Hungary)”

“Lo, aval ani Hungaria. (No, but I’m Hungarian)”

“So please keep it!”

“And he offers that 200 Forint he was holding.”

“No thank you, please keep it.”

Then he asked me about why I’m in Israel and I know all the handy words like work, boyfriend, love it here.

A perfect Hebrew 101 conversation in which both parties win: He enjoys my company, I enjoy practicing my Hebrew.

But then, I needed to leave and I ask for the chesbon (bill).

I tell him beteavon (enjoy your meal) as I am about to leave. He just started his second sauce-riched chicken wing.

“At rotza kzat? (Do you want some?)”

“Lo, toda raba. (No, thank you)”

And I left with far too many questions about that chicken wing.

Let me tell you something about Judaism

The first time I visited Israel we went to a Shabbat dinner to the brother of Mr. D. Let’s call the brother Mr. N.

Mr. N. and his family live nearby Jerusalem and are an observant Jewish family. I’m not sure they know, but I was really nervous before the dinner. It was my first Shabbat where I knew there would be praying and where I really shouldn’t be touching my phone.

They didn’t know me, but they did know I was a Christian. That Shabbat dinner was something I’ll never forget.

Five years passed and Mr. N. is still among the first people to help me or offer help whenever he sees an opportunity.

And here you need to learn a word with me, and that is MITZVAH.

While it literally translates as ‘command’, I prefer to say it means doing a ‘good deed.’ According to Judaism: “Mitzvot have a practical benefit for the person who does them as well as for the entire world.”

I’ve always felt that giving was more fulfilling for me than receiving, but now, as an #AlmostJewish, I got into mitzvot.

So when Mr.N. told me he had a friend who was going to Budapest to propose to her girlfriend and needed some help, I took up my part of the mitzvah. The guys had a beautiful engagement in my hometown and are planning their wedding.

But the circle isn’t full yet.

Once the engagement was sealed with a ‘yes,’ the groom told me if I ever needed help, he was here. So when I realized I wanted a logo for my site, I felt I needed an external eye as I’m too much involved.

I asked him if he could draft me something. I told him I liked hamsa.

A week later he sends me a hamsa with a beating heart.

So guys, go and do a good deed today, call it a mitzvah, or not – Christians have similar commands in the New Testaments, but I don’t think we have a name for it -, just do good.

I know it was a long story to show you my logo, but this is part of Judaism. Part of my Judaism.

And now, tell me what you think about my new logo?

Why I won’t celebrate International Women’s Day in 2017

I will be your party popper today.

While social media is going viral by celebrating the International Women’s Day, and the greatest pro-Israel organizations keep on sharing Golda Meir’s image with a touching quote, let me tell you something. This is just wrong.

#1 International Women’s Day was a communist celebration for workers. As I, a Hungarian, have nothing good to think of – or for the matter of fact remember – about communism, I don’t think that this day should mark my feminity.

# 2 Golda Meir was not a feminist. And while I look up to her intellectual, and as far as I am informed about her political acts, I can say, I like her. But just because someone breaks the glass ceiling, it does not mean she was a feminist.

When I was leading a women’s magazine, I made a thorough research on her. And trust me, she was a good leader, but she was not a feminist. At all. She became a good leader because she wasn’t one. She had huge issues and questions with about family and motherhood before she died. She was a womeMAN among men. But as I say, she was great, and her legacy should be spread, but not as a pioneer feminist.

#3 Rasmea Yousef Odeh (the woman in the picture) is the new face of feminism, the organizer of this year’s women’s day march. But few people know that she is a convicted terrorist who helped to assassinate two Israeli students. And while her version is different, and I am sure the truth is somewhere in-between; being mainstream can be a dangerous game.